The former metalworker and trade union leader Lúis Inácio ‘Lula’ da Silva — known to everyone as Lula — was elected president of Brazil in late 2002 in his fourth attempt since founding the Workers’ Party in 1980.

The Party Without Bosses features a discussion between Lula and the psychoanalyst Félix Guattari that took place in the heady days after the birth of the Workers’ Party. At the time, the optimism and radicalism of the 1970s in South America was beginning to fade in the face of Reaganism’s gathering momentum, and the Left had entered a protracted period of frustration and defeat.The discussion is introduced by leading Guattari scholar Gary Genosko and in addition contains his lively diaristic essay on the 2002 campaign.

This is a timely and engagingly idiosyncratic introduction to the early thinking of Lula, the man who may represent a rebirth of southern radicalism in the era of globalization.

Part of our Semaphore Series.

It is precisely the inappropriateness of Genosko’s book that makes it so fascinating and so pertinent. Resisting the tendency to be merely another example of the work prescribed by Empire, The Party Without Bosses nevertheless demands that the interview between Guattari and Lula, along with Guattari’s work on the IWC, remains applicable-even contemporary with present work on globalization. Genosko actively resists a narrow, temporal determinism, seeing the anachronistic as a site that must be opened again and again within what is considered present.

PoliticsandCulture.org

Subject Political Science/Political Process/Political Parties
Published May 2003
Price $10.95 CDN
Pages 87 pp (Paper)
Dimensions 5″ × 7″ × 0.25″
ISBN-10 1-894037-18-9
ISBN-13 9781894037181

Related Titles

Reviews

  • Politics and Culture writes:

    It is precisely the inappropriateness of Genosko’s book that makes it so fascinating and so pertinent. Resisting the tendency to be merely another example of the work prescribed by Empire, The Party Without Bosses nevertheless demands that the interview between Guattari and Lula, along with Guattari’s work on the IWC, remains applicable-even contemporary with present work on globalization. Genosko actively resists a narrow, temporal determinism, seeing the anachronistic as a site that must be opened again and again within what is considered present.

About the Author

Gary Genosko is Professor of Communication at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology.

Also by Gary Genosko

  • Contest – Essays on Sports, Culture and Politics