This remarkable collection of essays by leading Indigenous scholars focuses on the themes of freedom, liberation and Indigenous resurgence as they relate to the land. They analyze treaties, political culture, governance, environmental issues, economy, and radical social movements from an anti-colonial Indigenous perspective in a Canadian context.

Editor Leanne Betasamosake Simpson (Nishnaabekwe) has solicited Indigenous writers that place Indigenous freedom as their highest political goal, while turning to the knowledge, traditions, and culture of specific Indigenous nations to achieve that goal. The authors offer frank and political analysis and commentary of the kind not normally found in mainstream books, journals, and magazines.

Part of our Indigenous Collection.

Subject Social Science/Ethnic Studies/Native American Studies
Published July 2008
Price $21.95 CDN
Pages 232 pp (Paper)
Dimensions 5.5″ × 8.5″ × 0.5″
ISBN-10 1-894037-33-2
ISBN-13 978-1894037-33-4

Related Titles

Reviews

  • Scott Neigh, in A Canadian Lefty in Occupied Land writes:

    This book is a collection of essays mostly by young indigenous scholars from nations across Turtle Island. They draw from and contribute to a particular vision of resurgence and decolonization. This vision, at least as I understand it, focuses on the importance of indigenous people and nations revitalizing the land-people-language-tradition nexus—and it is key that these are seen as inseparable—as a basis for strengthening their capacity to persist, to resist, and to transcend the colonial domination they have faced for over five centuries.

  • John W. Friesen, in Canadian Ethnic Studies writes:

    …it should still be catalogued in every provincial and university library. The publication of this book clearly accentuates that there exists in the Native community an active and articulate group of writers who will continue to press ahead with the First Nations agenda.

  • Ursula Pflug, in The Niagra Falls Review writes:

    This important book will appeal to readers of both local and national Canadian history as well as to those with an interest in sustainability. Both subjects are presented from an Indigenous perspective still largely missing from mainstream publications. Activists involved in environmental and First Nations causes will find much to learn from and be inspired by.

About the Editor

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson is a renowned Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg scholar, writer and artist, who has been widely recognized as one of the most compelling Indigenous voices of her generation. Her work breaks open the intersections between politics, story and song—bringing audiences into a rich and layered world of sound, light, and sovereign creativity.

Working for over a decade an independent scholar using Nishnaabeg intellectual practices, Leanne has lectured and taught extensively at universities across Canada and has twenty years experience with Indigenous land based education. She holds a PhD from the University of Manitoba, is currently faculty at the Dechinta Centre for Research & Learning in Denendeh (NWT) and a Distinguished Visiting Scholar in the Faculty of Arts at Ryerson University. Leanne’s books are regularly used in courses across Canada and the United States including Dancing on Our Turtle’s Back, The Gift Is in the Making, Lighting the Eighth Fire (editor), This Is An Honour Song _(editor with Kiera Ladner) and _The Winter We Danced: Voice from the Past, the Future and the Idle No More Movement (Kino-nda-niimi editorial collective). Her paper “Land As Pedagogy” was awarded the Most thought-provoking 2014 article in Native American and Indigenous Studies. Her latest book, As We Have Always Done: Indigenous Freedom Through Radical Resistance is being published by the University of Minnesota Press in the fall of 2017.

As a writer, Leanne was named the inaugural RBC Charles Taylor Emerging writer by Thomas King. She has published extensive fiction and poetry in both book and magazine form. Her second book of short stories and poetry, This Accident of Being Lost is a follow up to the acclaimed Islands of Decolonial Love and was published by the House of Anansi Press in Spring 2017.

Leanne is also a musician combining poetry, storytelling, song writing and performance in collaboration with musicians to create unique spoken songs and soundscapes. Leanne’s second record f(l)light produced by Jonas Bonnetta (Evening Hymns), was released in the fall of 2016 on RPM Records. Leanne is Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg and a member of Alderville First Nation.

Also by Leanne Betasamosake Simpson