Protests in Seattle, Quebec City, and Genoa brought the anticorporate globalization movement to wide public awareness. But what are the roots of this movement, and where is it going? Another World is Possible traces the movement’s progress since 1994, and makes the case for the continued development of its anti-capitalist analysis and activism. In this major new work, David McNally considers contemporary social activists, and the political and economic orders they resist, in the context of historical capitalism in all its racial, gendered, and imperialist dimensions. Drawing on the experiences of radical movements of workers, peasants and indigenous peoples in Mexico, Korea, Bolivia, Indonesia and Brazil, among other countries, he sketches out an alternative, deeply radical politics based on diversity, internationalism, and moving beyond commodifi cation and the market.

Another World is Possible is widely read by activists and scholars. It considers contemporary social movements, and the political and economic orders they resist, in the context of historical capitalism in all its racial, gendered, and imperialist dimensions. This new revised edition incorporates McNally’s analysis of the invasion of Iraq, the fall-out for anti-globalization struggles in the North, and his new research into the inspiring resistance to global capitalism emerging in the South. McNally outlines an alternative, deeply radical politics based on diversity, internationalism, and moving beyond commodifi cation and the market.

Subject Political Science/Political Ideologies/Democracy
Published May 2006
Price $28.95 CDN
Pages 408 pp (Paper)
Dimensions 5.5″ × 8.5″ × 0.75″
ISBN-10 1-894037-27-8
ISBN-13 9781894037273

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About the Author

David McNally is a professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at York University, Toronto. He is author of Political Economy and the Rise of Capitalism, Against the Market and Bodies of Meaning: Studies on Language, Labor and Liberation, and an activist in labour, anti-poverty and social justice movements